International Journal on Magnetic Particle Imaging
Vol 6 No 2 Suppl. 1 (2020)

Short Abstracts

Magnetic Particle Imaging for intraoperative margin analysis in breast-conserving surgery

Main Article Content

Erica Mason (MGH/HST A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging), Eli Mattingly (Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences & Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA, and A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Dept. of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA), Konstantin Herb (A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Dept. of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA, and Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland), Sofia Franconi (A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Dept. of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA), Monika Sliwiak (A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Dept. of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA), Clarissa Cooley (A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Dept. of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA), Lawrence Wald (Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences & Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA, and A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Dept. of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA)

Abstract

Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is a commonly utilized treatment for early stage breast cancers but has high reexcision rates due to post-surgery identification of positive margins. A fast, specific, sensitive, easy-to-use tool for assessing margins intraoperatively has been shown to reduce the need for additional surgeries, and while many techniques have been explored, the clinical need is still unmet. We assess Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) for intraoperative margin assessment in BCS, using a passively or actively tumor-targeted iron oxide agent and two hardware devices: a hand-held Magnetic Particle (MP) detector for identifying residual tumor in the breast, and a small-bore imager for quickly imaging the tumor distribution in the excised specimen. In this abstract, we present both hardware systems and demonstrate proof-of-concept detection and imaging of clinically-relevant phantoms.

Article Details